US NEWS: Has Donald Trump Surrendered to Coronavirus

We’re getting into the heart of summer, but if you’re expecting a typical summer decline in presidential politics, don’t agree. The coronavirus epidemic is underway, family holidays are on hold, cable news coverage is on the rise and President Donald Trump is lighting up the nation’s culture wars to keep his organizations involved.

Most political parties, including the people we talk to around the Trump campaign, believe that the Republican president faces the prospect of a four-month financial loss unless the political situation changes dramatically. Recent history suggests there is a time for change, even though Trump has not taken steps to expand his alliance.

He briefly celebrated the much-anticipated works by the end of last week, but paid no attention to the economy in the Independence Day series focusing on what he described as the “angry masses” of intellectual cutters trying to destroy the cultural monuments.

At the time, Joe Biden presented his first press conference about three months ago with no major stumbling blocks. The former vice president and former president will continue to face tough questions, but until Trump manages to control the epidemic under control, it can be hard to hear for himself.


BIG QUESTIONS

Is Trump committed to a coronavirus?

Biden last week accused Trump of giving himself over to the epidemic, and given the president a disregarded COVID-19 as a weather infection, is it worth asking whether the nominee for the Democrats is OK?

Millions of voters saw images of Trump addressing thousands of unemployed supporters in Mount Rushmore on Friday, ignoring references to his medical professionals – and his daughter. In case you missed it, Ivanka Trump urged Americans to “get involved in the community and wear masks when they are close to each other” just before her father confronted a large South Dakota mob.

The U.S. has reported at least 50,000 new infections over the course of three consecutive days of July, a shocking number of attacks on the focus of the Sun Belt provinces that supported Trump four years ago. Many people in the United States have died from the disease, and many are infected in the world, according to statistics compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Trump has never offered a complete national plan to contain the epidemic. Although there is evidence that instead, he suspects people have gone for further testing, he suggested last week that the coronavirus would “disappear.”

Will the wars in Trump’s culture push the needle?

The nation is experiencing a state of public health, economic ruin and an alertness to ethnic divisions. What did Trump focus on on Freedom Day weekend? “Angry mobs are trying to undermine our images of our founders, corrupting our sacred monuments and committing violent crimes in our cities,” it warns.

The dark and divisive language is a new example of the kind of chasm that defined Trump’s political upheaval, but the political performance of both parties tells us that it is impossible to help the first president advance his weak position in key areas – women, minorities and educated college voters, among them.

And, since there is no other consistent message of restructuring, Trump relies on the politics of white grievances to help strengthen his base of white, working-class men. He does this even though a radical change is taking place in American culture away from the symbols of white supremacy. Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves, a Republican, signed a bill last week to remove the Confederate flag of the state flag, while Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill supported changing names of military bases named after Confederate military leaders.

Trump’s desire to dampen cultural warfare fueled Hillary Clinton’s victory in 2007. He bet all he can win in the same way as Biden is in 2020.

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