US NEWS: Sudan welcomes Mike Pompeo’s remarks about the naming of terrorists


Former President Omar Al Bashir took refuge in Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden and supported the bombing.

Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok will attend the inauguration of the new civic rulers on July 28. Khartoum welcomed US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s remarks and called for the removal of the list of supporters of the terrorist government.


Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok will attend the inauguration of the new civic rulers on July 28. Khartoum welcomed US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s remarks and called for the removal of the list of supporters of the terrorist government.


Khartoum accepted an earlier statement by the US Secretary of State that he should be removed from the list of government sponsors for intimidation.

Mike Pompeo had previously said that the State Department hoped to remove the surname, which severely hampers investment in Sudan, but disputes arose over the compensation fund for those who were bombed by two American bombers.

On Thursday, however, he told the Senate Foreign Affairs Committee that transforming the country under civilian rule was an opportunity for change.

Sudan’s state-run news agency, Suna, reported on Saturday that a reformed Khartoum cabinet had confirmed its willingness to work with the US on the move.

Mr Pompeo told the Senate Foreign Affairs Commitee that housing law should come before Congress “soon.

“I think that raising the government’s support for terrorist appointments if we can … caring for victims of such disasters would be a good thing for American foreign policy,” Mr. Pompeo said.

He said the fall of longtime dictator Omar Al Bashir in April 2019 and the government that succeeded the country’s Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, who has been in power since last August, “is a rare opportunity”.

“There is an opportunity not only for democracy to start building, but perhaps for regional opportunities to come,” he said.

Al Bashir welcomed Al Qaeda head Osama bin Laden to Sudan and the country was accused of aiding and abetting US forces in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998, killing 224 people and wounding about 5,000 others.

The new Sudanese government has agreed to provide compensation but has been embroiled in controversy over its decision to impose higher wages on Americans than on African citizens, many of whom have been traumatized.

Senator Chris Coons, a Democrat known for his interest in Africa, urged Mr Pompeo to “do his best” to support Mr Hamdok and to take the opportunity to “build a new democratic partner in the region”.

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